Starting at the beginning…

Keyword research starts a successful online presence and marketing campaign. But what is it? How can you do it better and what does it actually mean?

What is keyword research?

Keyword research is about what people type into search engines to find what they need.  It is essentially the gathering of search terms which are firstly relevant to your website and secondly that people are actually using. For example people who wish to buy a bicycle may type in the word bicycle into Google’s search box.

How do I find more information on keywords?

Google has a handy tool called Keyword Planner which you can access if you setup a Google Ads account. You can use it in different ways to give you keywords ideas and their search volume. The Keyword is the term typed into Google and Search Volume is the amount of times that keyword is typed into

Let’s run through an example. If I owned a Bicycle store and wanted to research keywords where would I start? How about the words around Bicycle? Would you target cycle, bicycle or bike? If we look at these words in Google’s keyword planner we can see the results below:

We can see in keyword planner that bike and bicycle have search volumes of 33100 and cycle has a much lower volume of 6600. What is interesting is that by also searching for the plurals bikes is also a top volume term of 40500. We might therefore think about targeting the keyword bikes more than we would cycles.

Competing for a search term like bike on its own will be extremely competitive. Let’s say our example business is actually a specialist in children’s bikes. So we need to think around the word children and bike and research the combinations of children, kids, boys and girls with the bicycle words.

Keyword Avg. Monthly Searches (exact match only)
kids bikes 14800
girls bikes 9900
boys bikes 5400
kids bike 3600
girls bike 3600
childrens bikes 2900
boys bike 1600
childrens bike 1000
kids bicycle 590
girls bicycle 480
boys mountain bikes 390
boys bicycles 260
children bike 210
kids bicycles 170
girls bicycles 140
kid bike 110
children bicycle 90
child bicycle 70
boys bicycle 70
kid bicycle 30

 

It is interesting to see the difference between some of the plurals and how much more search volume there is around girls than boys.  But what about delving deeper into what are known as long tail keywords such as a coloured girls children’s bike?

Keyword Avg. Monthly Searches (exact match only)
pink girls bike 140
pink kids bike 40
kids pink bike 40
pink girls bikes 20
pink girl bike 10
pink girl bikes 10
pink girls bicycle 10
pink kids bikes 10
pink childs bike 10
kids pink bikes 10
pink kid bike 10
pink kids bicycle 10
pink childrens bikes 10
kids pink bicycle 10
pink girl bicycle 10
pink kids bicycles 10

 

We can see above that the keywords “pink girls bike” has the most potential traffic. By taking these journeys through the keywords we can start to build a strategy and target the keyword that has the potential to drive the most traffic.

What should I do with this information?

The information can help create the strategy for the website in terms of content, how to describe the service being offered in the most valuable way and most importantly how to drive relevant traffic to the website.  For example, when creating a website you can group related keywords into categories and think about creating category pages on the website to target that specific market. In the example, we might want to think about creating a page targeting the words pink, kids, girls and bikes. By creating content that’s relevant with associated terms like pink girls bikes, this in turn will help the website rank for the shorter keyword searches “bikes” and “girls bikes” where the larger search volume is, while also obtaining high rankings for the specific long tail search. Also, by targeting the long tail keywords around pink girls bikes it might be that you are targeting people who have the intention to buy rather than people who are just researching the topic.

In summary keyword research essentially helps create and refine a website to market itself to the people searching for it. If you know how people are searching for what your business provides, you have found your market.


An Introduction to Small Business and Semantic Search

Search engines are changing and they’re evolving faster than ever before. Have you ever felt that Google knows exactly what you are looking for? That you are being prompted with suggestions that are eerily close to what you have in mind? Sometimes even before you’ve finished typing your query. How does Google understand your thoughts so well? How can it possibly know what you’re looking for? Welcome to the world of semantic search.

Semantic search is one of the most exciting developments of our time. It is also one that is levelling the playing field between large and small businesses. Now, even small businesses have a place in the search results – a place where they can attract visitors and triumph.

What is Semantic Search?

The word semantics comes from Ancient Greek and involves the study of meaning. Attempting to find meaning is nothing new on the internet.

Indeed, Tim Berners-Lee, the father of the modern web, originally coined the term semantic web, which is defined as “providing a common framework that allows data to be shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries.”

semantic_search_hummingbird

Although the theory and concepts behind semantic search are fairly easy to grasp, their very mechanism and the mathematics behind them are incredibly complex.

We are moving from a web of things to a web of people. From strings to things. Gone are the days where you can hide behind a large faceless portal and expect to build trust over the Internet.

The Knowledge Graph

The knowledge graph is often referred to as the brain behind semantic search.

Amit Singhal, the head of the Google Search team, retired last week. His replacement is John Giannandrea, none other than the man behind the Knowledge Graph, the recent Rankbrain update, the so-called Hummingbird algorithm and most of Google’s artificial intelligence initiatives in the last few years. With John around, AI and semantics will undoubtedly remain the major focus for Google.

John, like most techies, is a huge Star Trek fan. Anyone who’s ever seen an episode of Star Trek cannot help but be impressed by the computer onboard the Starship Enterprise – you know, the one that responds to voices, and that gets increasingly intelligent over time. The computer that ‘understands’ what you are asking it.

This is exactly where Google is headed. The search engine takes our queries, tries to understand the words, and delivers the same results a human would – the same results a friend would give you. And not just any friend, a close friend. A friend who understands you, who knows your current and previous locations, who knows your tastes and preferences and most importantly, knows your intentions.

Central to this new understanding is the Knowledge Graph.

The Knowledge graph semantic search

 

The knowledge graph uses fuzzy logic, which was first identified in the 1960s by Dr. Lotfi Zadeh, professor emeritus of computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. Fuzzy logic is a way to introduce “degrees of truth” into mathematics. It ascribes a mathematical value to logical variables, rather than a straight binary “yes” or “no.” Unlike traditional boolean logic, fuzzy logic allows Google to introduce probabilities into its calculations.

Each time you query Google, the results appear via semantic search, in the form of a list of possible answers. Google attempts to interpret the meaning of every query, by using all the information it has on you (for example, your location, search history, preferences, associations, friendships, your friends’ reviews, shopping history, the content of your emails and much more). It does all of this in order to give you answers based on your intent. Something which Google has become surprisingly good at over the years.

What can small businesses do?

When you think of semantics, you have to think about transparency and understanding. Semantics is all about you and the reasons you started your business in the first place. It’s about putting your passion on display and showing visitors what makes you stand out. What makes you special? And more importantly, why should visitors give you their business? First and foremost it’s about building trust.

Semantic search is so all encompassing and vast, that any attempts to manipulate it are doomed to failure. As a small business with limited time and resources, concentrate on the basics. Having a carefully optimised website, with a strong local presence and valuable content. Content that is going to help people. Content that is going to answer their questions and built trust.

It’s of little surprise that one of the most visited pages on any website is usually the ‘about us’ page. More so for e-commerce sites. People relate to people, they want to know about the people behind the site. A carefully thought out and written about us page goes a long way to building confidence.

Key Points for Small Businesses to keep in mind

  • What makes you special?
  • How do you stand out from your competitors?
  • Which qualities do you have that will make people trust you?
  • Think about your target demographics, the people you are trying to reach, your potential customers, what kinds of questions might they have? How are you addressing these questions?
  • Are you addressing these questions using the language your target audience would use?
  • Identify the problems that your business will help solve. How will you go about solving them? What solutions do you offer?

It is now more important than ever to provide real value to the end user. To take full advantage of semantic search, we have to go back to our basic values.

In other words, we have to provide value, answer visitors’ questions and exceed their expectations. The goal is to establish trust and build lasting relationships. As Tim Berners-Lee also stated, “The Web does not just connect machines, it connects people.”

 

For further reading on semantic search I recommend any books or articles written by David Amerland, his small business easy checklist and for a more technical (Google patent themed) reading list – seobythesea.


Can’t Rank Won’t Rank? Maybe The Problem Is The Domain

Why won't my website rank in Google?

“I don’t understand why my website doesn’t rank for my main terms, it’s so much better than all those other rubbish websites that Google is ranking instead.”  Of course, everyone believes that their website is the best but far too often we come across websites that just can’t seem to rank at all, no matter what you do to them or how good their content may be.

One of the toughest parts of the role of an SEO is not to get a website ranking but having to try to explain to a client why his/her website isn’t ranking and is unlikely to; the worst part being that sometimes we just don’t really know the exact reason.

Google uses over 200 different signals to evaluate where pages should rank for a given search term.  Additionally it frequently rolls out additional algorithms, such as Panda, Penguin, PayDay Loans to target particular spam or search quality issues.  There are so many factors that come into play to make a page rank that sometimes it’s not easy to tell exactly why one page ranks better than another.

What we often tend to find is that some domains are untrusted and these are unlikely to be able to rank highly in Google search results in the short-term, no matter what you do.  Manual and algorithmic penalties are supposed to have an expiry date but it could be years from now and most businesses can’t wait months let alone years to enjoy the benefits of good Google rankings.

We still have test websites that were penalised 4 years ago and today they are still not ranking.

Trust me, I’m not a link spammer

By far the biggest cause of lack of trust in a domain is if it has a very low quality backlink profile.  This can take the form of hundreds of bookmarking links, links from low quality directories, links from other untrusted sites or a very keyword heavy anchor text profile to cite just a few examples.

When a new client comes to us with a website which has this type of link profile, which is far more common than it should be, we have to make a decision as to whether we think the website has been flagged as “untrusted” and whether it would be best to start again with a new domain.

You can run some simple tests such as optimising pages in a certain way and seeing if the corresponding change in the rankings matches expectations, but ultimately the domain may be flagged as untrusted by Google and therefore the effort to get it to rank well may far outweigh the effort required to achieve good results with a new domain.

All is not lost with a new domain

There is always a lot of resistance from businesses when it comes to changing a domain name, for various reasons, but from a search rankings point of view you can start with a new domain but you aren’t necessarily starting from scratch.

You can’t just redirect an old, untrusted domain to the new one as you will just pass across the low trust signals to the new domain.  There are ways around this and it’s important to ensure that the new domain remains completely clean and independent of the old one.  Changing signals that tell Google what your new website address is such as Google+, local directories, business listings, etc., will help to accelerate the ranking of the new domain.

The clean-up operation

Over the years I’ve spent huge amounts of time cleaning-up websites to get them ranking again.  Cleaning up bad backlinks is very tough and although you can disavow links with Google, the process is far from guaranteed and Google can choose to accept or ignore what you put in your disavow file.  The Penguin algorithm flags websites as untrusted if they have spam backlinks.  The only way to recover from this is to clean up the bad backlinks and wait for Penguin to run again.  Seeing as it hasn’t run for over a year that’s a huge amount of time for any business to be struggling in Google search results.

If the issue is poor quality content or too many cookie-cutter pages (this is pure Panda fodder) this can also take a long time to correct and the efforts can take even longer to realise in search results.

Time is money and going through a clean-up process is generally very time-consuming and with no guaranteed outcome.

Sometimes it’s just best to bite the bullet and start afresh…a solution also stated by John Mueller (Google engineer) in this Google+ post:



Google's Real-Time Penguin Algorithm – Due for 2015

There could well be an extra gift under our Christmas tree this winter from a certain major search engine, with the next Google Penguin Update likely to arrive within the next two months. The new real-time Penguin algorithm version 4.0 is due for release at the end of this year. We’ve been expecting it and we’re going by news from Gary Illyes, the Webmaster Trends Analyst at Google, who said it would be released in 2015.

Penguin

What we are expecting of the next algorithm update is that it will be a real-time version, which means that the algorithm will update continuously in real time. The upcoming release is Penguin 4.0 and we’ve been told about these updates on many occasions in the past but until now we haven’t had a continuous update that won’t include any specific release dates. Instead of this, any detections of spammy links detected will be acted upon by Penguin.

When spammy links are removed once they are detected and the Google indexer is aware of this, the sites will stop being impacted by Penguin. The news on Penguin 4.0 is very brief at this stage but it’s intriguing to discover that it will indeed arrive before the end of 2015. So what is Real-time Penguin all about?

Real-Time Penguin

There’s not much information on the real-time algorithm update just yet but what we do know is that as soon as Google discovers that a link has been removed, the Penguin algorithm will do exactly what it says on the tin – process this in real time. You would therefore be able to recover from any penalty issued by Penguin pretty quickly, although you could also end up with a penalty just as quickly.

Get in Touch

Here at Artemis we stay up-to-date with all the latest happenings at Google to ensure our clients’ websites benefit and traffic continues to increase. Get in touch with us today to find out more.


3 Reasons Why SEO is Important for E-Commerce Sites

An effective SEO strategy that is solid and reliable is absolutely essential if any e-commerce site is to be successful in the long term. Whether your company is a miniature start-up or a global firm, SEO is what maximises the profitability of an e-commerce website.

The following reasons for SEO’s importance I the world of e-commerce come from a background of hard data rather than intuition, so you should take note of them when preparing your future SEO strategies…

seo-592747_640

Cost-Effectively Growing Your Bottom Line

Your efforts will always be more cost-effective when you are marketing strategy and sales are based around market and competition, thorough analysis of your situation and a tailored plan that complies with available resources and strengths.

The most competitive industries you may be forced to buy costly banner ads but with effective SEO you are less dependent on this traffic. While you still have the option of buying ads, effective SEO is a reliable way of ensuring your sales and profit continue to run smoothly. Traffic from organic search is free and that’s why SEO is so popular these days.

The successful e-commerce sites of this world take advantage of SEO and combine it with stuff like content marketing and social media marketing and various other marketing activities. Ultimately, you’ll achieve more by spending a lot less.

SEO Determines How Many Customers Find You

If you look at your analytics tool and identify where most of your traffic, sales and conversions come from, you’ll find that organic search is usually a top source of revenue. Profit-producing traffic is primarily driven by Google and if this isn’t the case for you, you are almost certainly making some mistakes down the line.

Nearly 90% of consumers now rely on search engines to clarify their purchase choices and if you don’t have an effective SEO strategy at your disposal, you’re probably invisible to a plethora of potential buyers.

It’s tempting to sit pretty on the organic search you get from Google but e-commerce sites can go so much further with a top quality SEO strategy that expands sales and revenue tenfold.

The Effects of SEO Last for a Long Time

SEO is the main provider of results that are cost-effective, targeted and measureable, as well as long-lasting. You can’t stop SEO in its tracks – it doesn’t quite work like that.

Paid advertising may give you the idea that pulling the plug results in a dramatic drop in traffic. SEO on the other hand just keeps on rolling. An effective SEO strategy improves itself year on year, so there’s no clean slate and starting from scratch.

You can use what you did last year to improve consistently and ultimately dominate or even own your particular niche.

 

Artemis Marketing has over 10 years experience delivering unrivalled SEO results for clients that include global e-commerce sites through to local campaigns for small businesses.

Get in touch today to find out how we can help your e-commerce site take the next step to achieving more revenue.


A Guide to Custom Reporting Using the Google Analytics Spreadsheet Add-on

funtastic analytics

A technical puzzle posed by a client had me scratching my head for a while. It went a little something like this

Client: “We would like to show data from our Google Analytics live within the site”
me: “….”
me: “….”

Custom Reporting Dashboards

Monthly reporting to one side there are a number of ways we can create custom reports within Google Analytics or using third party tools such as Cyfe (I love Cyfe), trouble is this either involves providing a public URL, scheduling reports to run periodically and emailing them on set days/dates or stakeholders logging into Google Analytics and finding the reports you have created.

All very useful yes, but I know very few clients that can actually wrap their heads around Google Analytics never mind dig for data to help them make decisions. So why not create custom dashboards that are part of an internal system, or even nearly live data dashboards that can be accessed at any time?

The Solution

I am not a coder by default, I understand various graphic languages such as HTML, CSS, a bit of PHP & JavaScript and can read and bend them to my will (read:hack them to get them to do what I want), but that’s where it ends. Imagine my dismay after spending days trying to get my head around Google Analytics superProxy, I did get there after a few days and had a working dashboard (to a degree), but hooking the Core, Real-time & Multi Channel APIs is not easy, besides that you need the “App engine”, Git Hub scripts … it goes on.

Then it quickly dawned on me, if it was that hard for me, how hard would it be to try and translate what I have learned to someone else?

Turns out Google had already thought about this and offered the solution to my puzzle at the same time. So enter the “Google Analytics Spreadsheet Add-on”, once you get your head around some of the terminology & you are in the swing of configuring the custom reports you can have a live interactive graph of your data setup within 15 minutes.

Setting up the Google Analytics Spreadsheet Add-on

1 – Login to Google Drive using the same username and password that you use for Google Analytics
2 – Click on New > Google Sheets from the left hand navigation

create new sheet
3 – Click on “Add-ons” from the sheet menu, then “get add-ons”

manage add-ons

4 – Search for “Google” in the search box and select Google Analytics by clicking the “Free” button

ga add on
5 – An alert box will appear requesting various permissions, scroll down within that box & click “Accept”

 

request permissions

Using the Google Analytics API within Google Sheets

Now that we have the API hooked up to our Google Sheets, we want to start polling the API, there is an extensive list of Dimensions and Metrics we can pull from the API all available here, but for the purposes of this walkthrough we are goiing to pull some basic stats..

1 – Click on “Add-Ons” & select “Google Analytics & then “Create New Report”

create report

 

2 – On the right hand side of the sheet a 3 step form will appear with various input options

 

create report dialog

 

3 – Give the report a name, select the GA account, property and view you want to pull data from, then select the metric and dimension you want to poll. Clicking within the input fields will reveal option lists to make life a little easier
4 – I have chosen a simple report for Sessions by Source/Medium for this example, click create report when you are ready
5 – You will notice that a new sheet has been created which contains the configuration that you just requested. I have also added in “-ga:sessions” and max results of 3, (top 3 sorted by highest to lowest)

report config

 

Running Reports Using the Google Analytics Add-On

So far so good, pretty pain free eh? It gets easier again! I am not going to go into too much detail about start and end dates or “Last N Days” here as I wanted to keep it simple, but when you are ready to go again.

1 – Click on “Add-ons” > “Google Analytics” > “Run Reports”

run report

How easy was that! An alert box appears once more to inform of the status of the report you have just ran & in the background the eagle eyed will have noticed metrics magically appearing

run report alert

Sharing the Report

Now that our data has been generated, next we need to present it in a much more readable format and share it, as ever the inbuilt capabilities of Google Sheets not only makes this easy but the permission based access also makes it shareable only with the eyes that need to see it. In my case though I wanted to make my data publicly available. As with any data in spreadsheets we look to present it through graphs and charts.

1 – Highlight your data
2 – Within the sheets menu click “insert” & “Chart” and select the chart type you want to use to present your data
3 – click insert
4 – change the chart title to make sense of your data (click on the title to edit)

charted data

5 – Click anywhere on the chart and notice the small drop down arrow, select it and click on “Publish Chart”

publish chart

6 – From the alert that appears select “Embed” and click publish

embed and publish
7 – Copy the highlighted iframe snippet
8 – You can now take this snippet and publish to your own test area

What you will have is an interactive chart like this

Updating the data

There are 2 ways to handle updating the data within the reports you have configured, either manually run the report again and your chart will change, or, and this is the beautiful part, you can schedule the data to automatically update!

Scheduling Updates for Your Interactive Charts

1 – Click “Add-ons” within the sheets menu & select “Google Analytics” & then “Schedule Reports”

schedule reports

2 – Select the checkbox for “Enable reports to run automatically”

automated reporting schedule

3 – Select when you want your reports to run

4 – Click save

This scheduling flexibility to automatically update our Google Analytics data saves a tonne of time.

Conclusion

So now we have a free way to create custom reporting dashboards from our Google Analytics data where all we need to do is configure them once and schedule to automatically update. Other than an iframe snippet there is no scripting involved, no oauth to worry about and the inbuilt permissions of Google Sheets takes care of the data integrity.

The following videos are more in depth guides to my simplistic guide, what they do offer though are introductions to working with more dimensions and metrics and custom date ranges and much much more.

Introduction to the Spreadsheet Add-on

Building a Dashboard with the Add-on


Another Google Algorithm Update…But It’s Not Panda

There has been plenty of speculation about a potential Panda algorithm update in the works and we’re expecting news on this in the coming weeks. However, an algorithm update did take place yesterday which Google confirmed as a core search algorithm update. Google released a statement sent to SearchEngineLand which said that core search algorithm updates are likely to become more commonplace in future as they focus on improving search quality.

Google

“This is not a Panda update. As you know, we’re always making improvements to our search algorithms and the web is constantly evolving. We’re going to continue to work on improvements across the board.”

The SEO community noticed ripples of change yesterday after the latest core search update and it’s highly likely that these were adjustments to the first core search algorithm we spotted back in early May, coined the Google Quality Update by SearchEngineLand.

Google tend not to give too much away in the event of a core search algorithm update, so we can be pretty certain it has nothing to do with Panda, Penguin or HTTPS. Mozcast was one of many automated tracking tools that displayed spikes in Google search results yesterday, with Dr Pete Meyers initially linking the events to a HTTPS algorithm change. Google’s Gary Illyes ruled this out on his Twitter account. One of the likely reasons for spikes is Wikipedia changing all its URLs to HTTPS this week.

So we continue to wait patiently for any changes to Panda, with yesterday’s events proving to be a false alarm. Google updates core search throughout the year, so we can expect to see them being reported more often from now on.

Contact Artemis today and find out how we can deliver unrivalled SEO results for your website.


Greater Haywards Heath Bike Ride 2015

Last Sunday, in what proved to be rather unfortunate weather conditions, we took to our road bikes and competed in the annual Greater Haywards Heath Bike Ride in aid of Kangaroos, a non-profit organisation that provides a wide range of recreational and leisure activities for children and young adults with severe learning disabilities.

The Greater Haywards Heath Bike Ride is the largest cycling event in Sussex and we all thoroughly enjoyed taking part.

Start Line Low Res IMG_2013_04_21_7698 (3)

We were overwhelmed by the support we received and are absolutely delighted to announce that we managed to raise considerably more for Kangaroos than our original target. The £1,468.42 we raised will certainly do a great deal for what is an incredibly positive, hard-working and inspirational organisation.

We would like to thank everyone who supported our effort through their contributions and wish Kangaroos all the best as they continue to provide a wonderful service to disabled children and young adults in Mid Sussex.

To find out how we can transform your website through expert SEO services and techniques to generate more for your business, contact Artemis Marketing today.


Artemis Ranked No.1 SEO Company by FreeIndex

Artemis Marketing are delighted to announce that we are now ranked 1st out of over 2000 UK Search Engine Optimisation companies in the UK. We are thrilled to have achieved such recognition from the UK’s most comprehensive local business review site FreeIndex.

Over the last three years we have worked with many different clients and received numerous positive reviews for our services in return. We have used our extensive knowledge of SEO to enhance our clients’ online presence and significantly increase traffic to their websites.

We make the most of a thoroughly professional and transparent approach to ensure our clients achieve truly outstanding results through their online business.

We received yet another positive review this week from one of our clients:

“After nearly 2 years of disappointment and a lot of expense wasted on so called SEO companies, Artemis had a difficult task ahead of them to put things right. Back in 2013 Mike and his team offered a realistic plan of action to get us back on track. Today, over a year in we couldn’t be happier with the results.

Great communication and professionalism from all the staff and a sound investment for any company.”

Kirsty Kerley, Lee Whiting – Resin Flooring Ltd – 21 May 2015

Get in touch with us today to find out more about how our expert SEO services can benefit your website.

 


Google Say More Searches Now On Mobile Than On Desktop

Google confirmed yesterday at a digital advertising conference that for the first time ever, more searches were being conducted from mobile devices than PCs. While they haven’t told us exactly how many searches are coming from our mobile screens, we can safely assume that it’s a pretty significant amount considering more than 100 billion search requests are processed by Google every month.

ipad-605440_640

Many will have been anticipating the mobile search leapfrog for some time, so this is certainly a landmark for Google and coincides with their recent, well-publicised algorithm update. There were some informal whispers coming from Google last year that suggested mobile would soon overtake desktop searches, so it would seem confirmation hasn’t come out of the blue.

Where Is Mobile Search Most Popular?

Google cited 10 countries where mobile search is most prevalent, naming the US and Japan as two of these countries. As well as not disclosing specific search figures and the additional eight countries, Google also declined to comment on how recently the change happened. They did say that mobile queries included browser-based searches as well as those coming from Google’s mobile search apps.

Remember that Google place desktops and tablets in the same bracket, so recorded mobile search queries only ever come from our smartphones. It’s difficult to determine the specifics behind the mobile take over with very little information released, although comScore have previously released a report and graphic that shows the volume of US-based search queries on PCs, tablets and smartphones.

comscore data

ComScore’s data greatly contradicts Google’s revelations, so it would seem that mobile search has either grown much faster than anticipated since these findings were published this time last year or the data is simply incorrect.

Impact Of The Mobile Changeover

What we do know is that online behaviour has changed considerably since 2007, when the first iPhone was released by Apple. This saw an influx of similar devices introduced to the market, changing the way we stayed connected and used online services. The popularity of mobile search today will certainly rock manufacturers loyal to their desktop and laptop computers.

However, Google were also affected in the past by the dramatic increase in smartphone sales, with ad prices declining to this day due to marketers being cautious over commercial messages displayed on smaller mobile screens. Google have countered this in the past, saying that ad prices have actually been rising and will continue to do so as marketers recognise the value of connecting with prospective customers through mobile-friendly advertising.

Mobile Is The Future For Marketers

These revelations have come about swiftly after the release of Google’s most talked-about algorithm update, giving the mobile-friendly algorithm a bit more colour and context. There’s no doubting the fact that mobile search is growing and smaller screens could now be exactly what marketers have to prioritise.

Contact Us

To find out if your site is mobile-friendly or to learn more about how Google’s latest revelation might affect you, get in touch with Artemis today.